NY couple shocked to find prohibition-era whisky concealed in house walls

NY couple shocked to find prohibition-era whisky concealed in house walls

HIGHLIGHTS

  • A couple named Patrick Bakker and Nick Drummond bought a property late last year in the town of Ames, New York for around $183,000.
  • While purchasing the property they came to know that in the 1920s it belonged to a ‘childless German baron who later turned out to be a bootlegging.’
  • They were astonished to discover 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey at their home hidden in the depths of floorboards and walls.
  • “I’m like what is that? I’m was very confused… I’m like holy crap. This is like a whiskey stash,” Drummond said.
  • The couple told their thousands of new Instagram followers, they’ll be trying the vintage booze.

KOLKATA (India) — A New York couple from Montgomery County, New York was astonished to discover 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey at their home hidden in the depths of floorboards and walls.

The couple named Patrick Bakker and Nick Drummond bought this property late last year in the town of Ames, New York for around $183,000.

While purchasing the property they came to know that in the 1920s it belonged to a ‘childless German baron who later turned out to be a bootlegging.’

Last month this couple started to renovate the 105-year-old three-story home and this is the time, to their utter surprise, they discovered old concealed whiskey in between the floors and walls.

They thought the story of the German bootlegger to be just folklore until they discovered this.

“I’m like what is that? I’m was very confused… I’m like holy crap. This is like a whiskey stash. And this is like, all of a sudden, the whole story of the bootlegger [makes sense],” the couple was quoted as saying.

Drummond shared a video of the moment to his Instagram page – which has attracted thousands of new followers. Apparently, they have changed their Instagram handle name to the ‘bootleggerbungalow’ to better reflects their newfound fame.

He also wrote, ‘OUR WALLS ARE BUILT OF BOOZE!’ “I can’t believe the rumors are true! He was actually a bootlegger! I mean I thought it was a cute story, but the builder of our house was ACTUALLY a bootlegger!”

Drummond told CNN that he found the bottles of whiskey wrapped in the brown paper while he was removing the outside skirting from a mudroom.

In the space of the wall, they found 42 bottles of whiskey. They also discovered more concealed liquor inside the mudroom underneath the floorboards. These bottles are of Old Smuggler Gaelic whiskey – a Scottish label that is still in production.

After they found these bottles, Drummond began to research the history of this home, and then some truth came out that it was owned by ‘a childless German baron who turned to bootlegging’.

The man was a German named Count Adolph Humpfner. He left a good fortune after dying mysteriously in 1932.

Drummond further told to his Instagram followers, “His estate was worth over $140,000 in 1932.”

He was the owner of a school gymnasium, a local bank, and 23 properties in NYC and NJ and it was a mystery to the locals at that time that how he gathered so much fortune.

Now, it can be understood that he gathered his fortune by bootlegging in the Prohibition-era, which ran from 1920- 1933.  

Ames is situated between New York City and the Canadian border, which made it perfect for bootleggers to bring illegal alcohol from the north.  

1920 to 1933 was called the Prohibition-era in the US, where there was a constitutional ban on the transportation, production, and sale of liquor. The aim was to heal an ill society caused by alcohol-related problems such as family violence, alcoholism, and more.

NOTE: This story has been updated to correct an error that mistakenly stated the place of the incident as New York City.

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